BER Research Highlights

Search Date: December 13, 2017

2 Records match the search term(s):


July 23, 2012

Steve Wofsy (Harvard University) will be awarded the 2012 Roger Revelle Medal at this year's American Geophysical Union meeting

The Revelle Medal is awarded to an individual "for outstanding contributions in atmospheric sciences, atmosphere-ocean coupling, atmosphere-land coupling, biogeochemical cycles, climate, or related aspects of the Earth system." Wofsy is being recognized for a distinguished career in the factors that regulate atmospheric composition, including experimental field studies of the carbon cycle using long-term eddy-covariance measurements of atmosphere-biosphere exchange in tropical, boreal, and midlatitude forests. Wofsy is currently supported by BER's Terrestrial Ecosystem Science program and is working on land-biosphere interactions (biogenic volatile organic compound and trace gas emissions) in Brazil. Wofsy was also an organizer for the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiment: Tropics workshop held in Bethesda, Md., in June 2012.

References: Roger Revelle Medal (Reference link)
Steve Wofsy (Reference link)

Contact: Daniel Stover, SC-23.1, (301) 903-0289
Topic Areas:

Division: SC-23.1 Climate and Environmental Sciences Division, BER


June 27, 2012

Uncertainty Quantification Framework Applied to Community Land Model Reveals Uncertainty in Model Hydrology

Many aspects of land hydrology in climate models are uncertain and important for correctly simulating climate and cloud changes. A new, more precise system of estimating land model uncertainties has been designed and implemented in the Community Land Model (CLM4) by U.S. Department of Energy scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. They analyzed the sensitivity of simulated surface heat and energy fluxes to selected hydrologic parameters in CLM4 by applying a new method of uncertainty quantification (UQ) to 13 Ameriflux tower sites that span a wide range of climate conditions and provide measurements of surface water, energy, and carbon fluxes. UQ is used to select the most influential CLM parameters for increased focus and research. The results suggest that the CLM4 simulated latent/sensible heat fluxes show the largest sensitivity to parameters associated with subsurface runoff. This work is the first UQ study on the CLM4 and has demonstrated that uncertainties in hydrologic parameters could have significant impacts on the simulated water and energy fluxes and land surface states, which will in turn affect atmospheric processes and the carbon cycle.

Reference: Hou, Z., M. Huang, L. R. Leung, G. Lin, and D. M. Ricciuto. 2012. “Sensitivity of Surface Flux Simulations to Hydrologic Parameters Based on an Uncertainty Quantification Framework Applied to the Community Land Model,” Journal of Geophysical Research Atmospheres, DOI: 10.1029/2012JD017521. (Reference link)

Contact: Dorothy Koch, SC-23.1, (301) 903-0105
Topic Areas:

Division: SC-23.1 Climate and Environmental Sciences Division, BER