BER Research Highlights

Search Date: October 19, 2017

2 Records match the search term(s):


November 14, 2001

Multiple Methods of Estimating Ecosystem Water Use Evaluated in the Field at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Evapotranspiration (ET) in terrestrial ecosystems is a critical component of the climate system, and better understanding of controls on, and magnitudes of, ET is needed to improve climate models. A multi-year, multi-method study of ET was conducted in an uneven-aged mixed-species deciduous forest at the DOE National Environmental Research Park at Oak Ridge, TN, by Oak Ridge National Laboratory scientist Dr. Paul Hanson and several of his colleagues. The study will lead to improved understanding of water use by forests, and as a result, improved understanding of Earth's climate systems. Key results of this BER-funded study were published recently in Agricultural and Forest Meteorology.

Contact: Jeff Amthor, SC-74, 3-2507
Topic Areas:

Division: SC-23.1 Climate and Environmental Sciences Division, BER
      (formerly SC-74 Environmental Sciences Division, OBER)


June 06, 2001

Carbon Sequestration Is Enhanced by CO2 Enrichment and Addition of Nutrients.

A Free-Air-CO2-Enrichment (FACE) experiment with a pine forest reports that addition of nutrients significantly enhances growth and carbon sequestration. In the May 23, 2001, issue of Nature science magazine, Ram Oren, Dave Ellsworth, and colleagues report that the enhanced growth is due to the synergistic effect of elevated CO2 and simultaneous nutrient fertilization of the soil. The growth and sequestration responses of this forest ecosystem were greatest when poorest quality sites received CO2 and nutrient amendments. Forests occupy many sites with low soil fertility in the Southeastern United States, and these FACE experiments provide clues about how they are likely to respond as the atmospheric CO2 increases in future years. The research conducted by Duke University and Brookhaven National Laboratory is providing unique data for a wide range of physiological, biogeochemical and ecosystem responses to CO2, and these results from the combined CO2 and nutrient experiment demonstrate the role of fertility in ecosystem carbon cycle and sequestration processes.

Contact: Roger C Dahlman, SC-74, 3-4951
Topic Areas:

Division: SC-23.1 Climate and Environmental Sciences Division, BER
      (formerly SC-74 Environmental Sciences Division, OBER)