U.S. Department of Energy Office of Biological and Environmental Research

BER Research Highlights


A Parsimonious Modular Approach to Building a Mechanistic Belowground Carbon and Nitrogen Model
Published: September 21, 2017
Posted: November 21, 2017

New microbial model explains observed relationship between heterotrophic respiration and temperature.

The Science
This study developed a new model of microbial soil decomposition that successfully captured the changing relationship between temperature and microbial respiration during the growing season. We showed that the soil microbial response to plant inputs depends on the nitrogen content of the added plant material.

The Impact
We developed a new model for predicting soil response to changes in soil temperature, moisture, plant inputs and stoichiometry. This model is simple and based on well-defined physical and biological properties, and could be developed to model microbial activity at larger scales.

Summary
Microorganisms that grow in the soil, like bacteria and fungi, affect how much carbon resides in the soil and how much is released to the atmosphere as CO2. Mathematical models used to make climate change predictions often struggle to capture the activity of soil microbes in realistic ways. This study uses well-established descriptions of water and temperature effects on soil microbes to predict rate of carbon and nitrogen cycling in the soil. The new model (called the Dual Arrhenius Michaelis-Menten-Microbial Carbon and Nitrogen Physiology, or DAMM-MCNiP), reproduces the changing relationship between temperature and microbial respiration during the growing season. The study also shows using a theoretical addition of root secretions that the microbial response depends on the nitrogen content of the added plant material. This model is simple and based on well-defined physical and biological properties, and could be developed to model microbial activity at larger scales.

Contacts
(BER PM)

Dan Stover
SC-23.1
Daniel.stover@science.energy.gov

(PI Contact)
Adrien Finzi / Rose Abramoff
Boston University / Lawrence Berkeley National Lab
afinzi@bu.edu / rzabramoff@lbl.gov

Funding
U.S. Department of Energy, grants DE-SC0006916, DE-SC0012288, and DE-AC02-05CH11231; the National Science Foundation (DEB 1237491); U.S. Department of Agriculture grant 2014-67003-22073; and the American Association of University Women Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship.

Publications
R.Z. Abramoff, E.A. Davidson, A.C. Finzi. 2017. “A Parsimonious Modular Approach to Building a Mechanistic Belowground Carbon and Nitrogen Model,” JGR Biogeosciences, 122. 10.1002/2017JG003796

Related Links
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2017JG003796/abstract

Topic Areas:

  • Research Area: Earth and Environmental Systems Modeling
  • Research Area: Terrestrial Ecosystem Science
  • Research Area: Carbon Cycle, Nutrient Cycling

Division: SC-23.1 Climate and Environmental Sciences Division, BER

 

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