U.S. Department of Energy Office of Biological and Environmental Research

BER Research Highlights


A Belowground Perspective On Forest Drought
Published: September 13, 2016
Posted: November 22, 2016

Subsurface interactions between roots and soils offer improved predictions for managing climate change impacts.

The Science
Key data on root distributions and soil water potential from prior Department of Energy-funded precipitation manipulations on the Oak Ridge Reservation (Tennessee) were used to illustrate mechanistic modeling needs. Results show challenges and opportunities associated with managing forests under conditions of increasing drought frequency and intensity and provide a belowground perspective on drought that may facilitate improved forest management.

The Impact
The study highlights how a belowground perspective of drought can be used in climate models to reduce uncertainty in predicting ecosystem consequences of droughts in forests.

Summary
Predicted increases in the frequency and intensity of droughts across the temperate biome have highlighted the need to examine the extent to which forests may differ in their sensitivity to water stress. At present, a rich body of literature exists on how leaf- and stem-level physiology influence tree drought responses. Less is known, however, regarding the dynamic interactions that occur belowground between roots and soil physical and biological factors. Consequently, better understanding is needed of how and why processes occurring belowground influence forest sensitivity to drought. This study reviews what is known about tree species’ belowground strategies for dealing with drought, and how physical and biological characteristics of soils interact with rooting strategies to influence forest sensitivity to drought. Findings show how a belowground perspective of drought can be used in models to reduce uncertainty in predicting ecosystem consequences of droughts in forests. Additionally, the researchers describe the challenges and opportunities associated with managing forests under conditions of increasing drought frequency and intensity and explain how a belowground perspective on drought may facilitate improved forest management.

Contacts (BER PM)
Daniel Stover and Jared DeForest
SC-23.1
Daniel.Stover@science.doe.gov; Jared.DeForest@science.doe.gov

(PI Contact)
Paul J. Hanson
Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Climate Change Science Institute
Email: hansonpj@ornl.gov

Funding
This work was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research; and National Science Foundation.

Publication
Phillips, R. P., I. Ibanez, L. D’Orangeville, P. J. Hanson, M. G. Ryan, and N. McDowell. 2016.“A Belowground Perspective on the Drought Sensitivity of Forests: Towards Improved Understanding and Simulation,” Forest Ecology and Management 380, 309-20. (Reference link)

Topic Areas:

  • Research Area: Earth and Environmental Systems Modeling
  • Research Area: Terrestrial Ecosystem Science

Division: SC-23.1 Climate and Environmental Sciences Division, BER

 

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