BER launches Environmental System Science Program. Visit our new website under construction!

U.S. Department of Energy Office of Biological and Environmental Research

BER Research Highlights


Elevated CO2 Levels Alter Forest Succession and Carbon Cycling
Published: November 18, 2015
Posted: May 06, 2016

Regenerating forests influence the global carbon cycle, and understanding how climate change will affect patterns of regeneration and carbon storage is necessary to predict the rate of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) increase in future decades. While experimental CO2 elevation has revealed that young forests respond with increased productivity, there remains considerable uncertainty as to how the long-term dynamics of forest regrowth are shaped by elevated CO2 (eCO2). In a recent study, researchers used the mechanistic size- and age-structured Ecosystem Demography model to investigate the effects of CO2 enrichment on forest regeneration, using data from the Duke Forest Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (FACE) experiment, a forest, and an eddy-covariance tower for model parameterization and evaluation. They found that the dynamics of forest regeneration are accelerated, and stands consistently hit a variety of developmental benchmarks earlier under eCO2. Because responses to eCO2 varied by plant functional type, successional pathways and mature forest composition differed under eCO2, with mid- and late-successional hardwood functional types experiencing greater increases in biomass compared to early-successional functional types and the pine canopy. Over the simulation period, eCO2 led to an increase in total ecosystem carbon storage of 9.7 Mg carbon/ha. Model predictions of mature forest biomass and ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of CO2 and water were sensitive to assumptions about nitrogen limitation; both the magnitude and persistence of the ecosystem response to eCO2 were reduced under nitrogen limitation. These simulations demonstrate that eCO2 can result in a general acceleration of forest regeneration, while altering the course of successional change and having a lasting impact on forest ecosystems.

Reference: Miller, A. D., M. C. Dietze, E. H. DeLucia, and K. J. Anderson-Teixeira. 20156. “Alteration of Forest Succession and Carbon Cycling Under Elevated CO2,” Global Change Biology 22(1), 351-63. DOI: 10.1111/gcb.13077. (Reference link)

Contact: Jared DeForest, SC-23, (301) 903-3251, Daniel Stover, SC-23.1, (301) 903-0289
Topic Areas:

  • Research Area: Earth and Environmental Systems Modeling
  • Research Area: Terrestrial Ecosystem Science
  • Research Area: Carbon Cycle, Nutrient Cycling
  • Research Area: Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE)

Division: SC-33.1 Earth and Environmental Sciences Division, BER

 

BER supports basic research and scientific user facilities to advance DOE missions in energy and environment. More about BER

Recent Highlights

Mar 23, 2021
Molecular Connections from Plants to Fungi to Ants
Lipids transfer energy and serve as an inter-kingdom communication tool in leaf-cutter ants&rsqu [more...]

Mar 19, 2021
Microbes Use Ancient Metabolism to Cycle Phosphorus
Microbial cycling of phosphorus through reduction-oxidation reactions is older and more widespre [more...]

Feb 22, 2021
Warming Soil Means Stronger Microbe Networks
Soil warming leads to more complex, larger, and more connected networks of microbes in those soi [more...]

Jan 27, 2021
Labeling the Thale Cress Metabolites
New data pipeline identifies metabolites following heavy isotope labeling.

Analysis [more...]

Aug 31, 2020
Novel Bacterial Clade Reveals Origin of Form I Rubisco
Objectives

  • All plant biomass is sourced from the carbon-fixing enzyme Rub [more...]

List all highlights (possible long download time)