BER launches Environmental System Science Program. Visit our new website under construction!

U.S. Department of Energy Office of Biological and Environmental Research

BER Research Highlights


Dimethyl Sulfide Emissions in the Amazon Rainforest
Published: January 08, 2015
Posted: November 03, 2015

Surface-to-atmosphere emissions of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) may impact global climate through the formation of gaseous sulfuric acid, which can yield secondary sulfate aerosols and contribute to new particle formation. While oceans are generally considered the dominant sources of DMS, a shortage of ecosystem observations prevents an accurate analysis of terrestrial DMS sources. Using mass spectrometry, researchers recently quantified ambient DMS mixing ratios within and above a primary rainforest ecosystem in the central Amazon Basin in real time (2010–2011) and at high vertical resolution (2013–2014). Elevated, but highly variable DMS mixing ratios were observed within the canopy, showing clear evidence of a net ecosystem source to the atmosphere during both day and night in both the dry and wet seasons. Periods of high DMS mixing ratios lasting up to 8 hours [up to 160 parts per trillion (ppt)] often occurred within the canopy and near the surface during many evenings and nights. Daytime gradients showed mixing ratios (up to 80 ppt) peaking near the top of the canopy as well as near the ground following a rain event. The spatial and temporal DMS distribution suggests that ambient levels and their potential climatic impacts are dominated by local soil and plant emissions. A soil source was confirmed by measurements of DMS emission fluxes from Amazon soils as a function of temperature and soil moisture. Furthermore, light- and temperature-dependent DMS emissions were measured from seven tropical tree species. This study has important implications for understanding terrestrial DMS sources and their role in coupled land-atmosphere climate feedbacks.

Reference: Jardine, K., A. M. Yañez-Serrano, J. Williams, N. Kunert, A. Jardine, T. Taylor, L. Abrell, P. Artaxo, A. Guenther, C. N. Hewitt, E. House, A. P. Florentino, A. Manzi, N. Higuchi, J. Kesselmeier, T. Behrendt, P. R. Veres, B. Derstroff, J. D. Fuentes, S. T. Martin, and M. O. Andreae. 2015. “Dimethyl Sulfide in the Amazon Rainforest,” Global Biogeochemical Cycles 29(1), 19–32. DOI: 10.1002/2014GB004969. (Reference link)

Contact: Jared DeForest, SC-23, (301) 903-3251, Daniel Stover, SC-23.1, (301) 903-0289
Topic Areas:

  • Research Area: Atmospheric System Research
  • Research Area: Terrestrial Ecosystem Science

Division: SC-33.1 Earth and Environmental Sciences Division, BER

 

BER supports basic research and scientific user facilities to advance DOE missions in energy and environment. More about BER

Recent Highlights

Mar 23, 2021
Molecular Connections from Plants to Fungi to Ants
Lipids transfer energy and serve as an inter-kingdom communication tool in leaf-cutter ants&rsqu [more...]

Mar 19, 2021
Microbes Use Ancient Metabolism to Cycle Phosphorus
Microbial cycling of phosphorus through reduction-oxidation reactions is older and more widespre [more...]

Feb 22, 2021
Warming Soil Means Stronger Microbe Networks
Soil warming leads to more complex, larger, and more connected networks of microbes in those soi [more...]

Jan 27, 2021
Labeling the Thale Cress Metabolites
New data pipeline identifies metabolites following heavy isotope labeling.

Analysis [more...]

Aug 31, 2020
Novel Bacterial Clade Reveals Origin of Form I Rubisco
Objectives

  • All plant biomass is sourced from the carbon-fixing enzyme Rub [more...]

List all highlights (possible long download time)