U.S. Department of Energy Office of Biological and Environmental Research

BER Research Highlights


Increased Nitrogen Deposition Slows Carbon Decomposition in Forest Soils
Published: December 07, 2012
Posted: February 26, 2013

Global production of agricultural fertilizers has vastly increased the amount of nitrogen compounds entering natural terrestrial ecosystems. Although it is clear that increased nitrogen availability boosts primary productivity (i.e., plant growth) in ecosystems, the impacts of this nitrogen influx on the decomposition of dead plant material by soil microbes remain poorly understood. A collaborative team of U.S. Department of Energy researchers at the Universities of Michigan and Oklahoma examined carbon decomposition by soil fungi and bacteria at an experimental forest site in Michigan. GeoChip 4.0, a DNA microarray containing probes for thousands of functional genes, was used to measure expression of genes involved in degradation of complex carbon compounds in soil samples from sites that have been exposed to elevated nitrogen input for the past 18 years. Compared to nearby control plots, sites with elevated nitrogen showed significant decreases in the diversity and overall expression levels of fungal and actinobacterial genes involved in deconstruction of cellulose, lignin, and other plant compounds. This finding correlates with a long-term observation of decreased carbon decomposition rates in soils at the nitrogen-elevated sites and points to the specific mechanism underlying this shift. These findings shed new light on poorly understood processes occurring in forest soils and improve our ability to better predict how ecosystems will respond to changing environmental variables.

Reference: Eisenlord, S. D., Z. Freedman, D. R. Zak, K. Xue, Z. He, and J. Zhou. 2013. "Microbial Mechanisms Mediating Increased Soil Carbon Storage under Elevated Atmospheric Nitrogen Deposition," Applied Environmental Microbiology 79, 1191–99. DOI: 10.1128/AEM.03156-12. (Reference link)

Contact: Joseph Graber, SC-23.2, (301) 903-1239
Topic Areas:

  • Research Area: Terrestrial Ecosystem Science
  • Research Area: Carbon Cycle, Nutrient Cycling
  • Research Area: Genomic Analysis and Systems Biology
  • Research Area: Microbes and Communities

Division: SC-23.2 Biological Systems Science Division, BER

 

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