U.S. Department of Energy Office of Biological and Environmental Research

BER Research Highlights


White Rot Fungus Sequence Provides New Understanding of Lignin Degradation
Published: March 20, 2012
Posted: August 20, 2012

Lignin is a key building block in plant cell walls and one of the two most abundant biopolymers on Earth. It is also highly resistant to breakdown, complicating efforts to use plant biomass for producing biofuels. No animals and few fungi or bacteria are able to degrade lignin. However, the white rot fungus Ceriporiopisis subvermispora not only degrades lignin but leaves the cellulose in biomass intact. An international team of scientists has sequenced and annotated (assigned possible functions to genes) the genome of this fungus to learn more about its mechanisms of lignin degradation. Using experiments and a comparison with the sequence of its more studied relative Phanaerochaete chrysosporium, the scientists identified differences in the degradation genes between the two fungi and developed new hypotheses about the mechanisms that enable these fungi to target lignin but not cellulose. These results may assist in the development of improved pathways for the conversion of biomass to biofuels as well as provide improvements in deconstruction of wood for the pulp and paper industry. The study included researchers at the DOE's Joint Genome Institute (DOE-JGI).

Reference: Fernandez-Fueyo, E., et al. 2012. "Comparative Genomics of Ceriporiopsis subvermispora and Phanerochaete chrysosporium Provide Insight into Selective Ligninolysis," Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 109(14), 5458-63. DOI:10.1073/pnas.1119912109. (Reference link)

Contact: Dan Drell, SC-23.2, (301) 903-4742
Topic Areas:

  • Research Area: Genomic Analysis and Systems Biology
  • Research Area: Microbes and Communities
  • Research Area: DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI)
  • Research Area: Sustainable Biofuels and Bioproducts

Division: SC-23.2 Biological Systems Science Division, BER

 

BER supports basic research and scientific user facilities to advance DOE missions in energy and environment. More about BER

Recent Highlights

Aug 24, 2019
New Approach for Studying How Microbes Influence Their Environment
A diverse group of scientists suggests a common framework and targeting of known microbial processes [more...]

Aug 08, 2019
Nutrient-Hungry Peatland Microbes Reduce Carbon Loss Under Warmer Conditions
Enzyme production in peatlands reduces carbon lost to respiration under future high temperatures. [more...]

Aug 05, 2019
Amazon Forest Response to CO2 Fertilization Dependent on Plant Phosphorus Acquisition
AmazonFACE Model Intercomparison. The Science Plant growth is dependent on the availabi [more...]

Jul 29, 2019
A Slippery Slope: Soil Carbon Destabilization
Carbon gain or loss depends on the balance between competing biological, chemical, and physical reac [more...]

Jul 15, 2019
Field Evaluation of Gas Analyzers for Measuring Ecosystem Fluxes
How gas analyzer type and correction method impact measured fluxes. The Science A side- [more...]

List all highlights (possible long download time)